Help - Search - Member List - Calendar
Full Version: 2017 Toyota Tundra Lance 650
Truck Camper Forum > General > Support Equipment
trailerparkboy
Can someone please clarify if the truck camper weight is determined strictly by the payload weight of the truck bed, or is it a combination of axle weight. I currently have a 2017 Tundra SR5 double cab and I'm looking for a Lance 650.

Anyone with this type of set-up or similar would like some information if possible.

Dry Weight w/Std. Equipment 1694 Lbs.
Wet Weight w/Std. Equipment 1897 Lbs


Tundra Payload weight: 1630 lbs

GAWR FRT: Front 4000 lbs
Rear 4150 lbs


Thanks,
Brian
skyhammer
Neither,camper weight is determined by the weight of the camper only.I have a double cab Tundra and I would not put that camper on my truck without some suspension aids.
According to this site,http://www.truckcampermagazine.com/buyers-guide/hard-side/lance-camper/, that camper will weigh nearly 2500lbs.
You can shave some of those pounds off, but you will still be at over 2000lbs.
I have carried a pallet that weighs 2000lbs in my Tundra. The load was at the front of the bed and I bottomed out the rear suspension all the time, even going slow.
I only traveled 50 miles and it was painful.
Keep in mind that your useful payload will probably be even less as it doesn't account for how many passengers and how much stuff you carry in the truck.
trailerparkboy
Thanks for the response. I plan on using airbags and whatever suspension equipment is necessary for safety. The local Lance representative indicates the Lance 650 truck camper is perfectly safe for my vehicle with the proper suspension modifications. I don't plan on having water in any of the tanks while traveling and plan on staying at RV parks that have full hook up.
Nobody
QUOTE(trailerparkboy @ Feb 12 2017, 07:07 PM)
Thanks for the response. I plan on using airbags and whatever suspension equipment is necessary for safety. The local Lance representative indicates the Lance 650 truck camper is perfectly safe for my vehicle with the proper  suspension modifications. I don't plan on having water in any of the tanks while traveling  and plan on staying at RV parks that have full hook up.
*



I've been hauling truck campers since the 1960s, some overweight, some not. It's been my experience that dealers/mfgr representatives will tell ya 'anything' to make a sale, whether accurate or not. It's your responsibility to KNOW the capacity of your truck & how it is equipped. Carrying an overweight camper is never a good idea. The Lance campers are built kinda heavy for their size & are known as the 'tanks' of the truck camper world (in my experience). Air bags & suspension 'beefed up' won't make up for weaker spindles & lighter drive components...
SidecarFlip
QUOTE(Nobody @ Feb 15 2017, 09:21 AM)
I've been hauling truck campers since the 1960s, some overweight, some not. It's been my experience that dealers/mfgr representatives will tell ya 'anything' to make a sale, whether accurate or not. It's your responsibility to KNOW the capacity of your truck & how it is equipped. Carrying an overweight camper is never a good idea. The Lance campers are built kinda heavy for their size & are known as the 'tanks' of the truck camper world (in my experience). Air bags & suspension 'beefed up' won't make up for weaker spindles & lighter drive components...
*



Exactly. I own a Lance and I agree, they are all barges. Drummers (RV salesmen) will tell you anything to make a sale. Keep in mind that once it's on your truck...it's yours along with the payment book, not their issue and finally..

You can modify about any suspension to carry about any weight and look 'good', but like Nobody says, the components you cannot see, spindles, bearings, differential gears, brakes, driveline and transmission are all overloaded and can fail much sooner than if not overloaded.

Then there is emergency stopping, evasive maneuver issue. Being over capacity adversely impacts stopping distance and handling. Nothing better than stabbing the brakes in an emergency situation and eating the rear end of the vehicle in front of you or running over a pedestrian because you cannot stop.

All things to consider...serious things to consider.
trailerparkboy
QUOTE(SidecarFlip @ Feb 15 2017, 01:05 PM)
Exactly.  I own a Lance and I agree, they are all barges.  Drummers (RV salesmen) will tell you anything to make a sale.  Keep in mind that once it's on your truck...it's yours along with the payment book, not their issue and finally..

You can modify about any suspension to carry about any weight and look 'good', but like Nobody says, the components you cannot see, spindles, bearings, differential gears, brakes, driveline and transmission are all overloaded and can fail much sooner than if not overloaded.

Then there is emergency stopping, evasive maneuver issue.  Being over capacity adversely impacts stopping distance and handling.  Nothing better than stabbing the brakes in an emergency situation and eating the rear end of the vehicle in front of you or running over a pedestrian because you cannot stop.

All things to consider...serious things to consider.
*


trailerparkboy
According to the Lance website, the Lance 650 and 825 are designed for the half ton pick ups, specifically the Tundra and Nissan Titan.

Lance 650My Webpage
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2020 Invision Power Services, Inc.