IPB
Truck Camper Parts

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )


Night_Sailor Posted on: Mar 1 2013, 11:15 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


I recommend looking at the type of tire you like and compare those on Tire Rack. The reviews will give you a good idea of the performance.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #8127 · Replies: 4 · Views: 9,522

Night_Sailor Posted on: Mar 1 2013, 11:02 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


QUOTE(harleyajk @ Jan 24 2013, 08:51 AM)
We currently own a 2012 F450 4x4 Dually and want to purchase a truck camper.  The models we have seen online that we like and think would work for us are the Chalet TS 116, Host Everest and maybe the Lance 1172.

<snip>
We are especially concerned about the weight of these campers on our current vehicle.


*




If all you have is a horse, all you can carry is a bedroll. You have an F450! You can carry more than most.

I saw one of these Chalet Triple Slides at an RV place on Long Island last year. I can't speak about the other campers. I didn't know anyone else made triples in Truck Campers.

All I can say is it absolutely blew my mind how nice they are. I never thought I would have considered buying one until I saw one.

It is also physically very big, and very expensive, around $55,000 +/-. The slide mechanism is impressive, and it opens up like Dr Who's telephone booth into what seems like house and has a huge basement for storage. The construction is new technology and very strong. Once again--it is very, very, spacious inside. I did not like the sink but that is being nit picky. You have to open up the slides to enter, which is a problem if you just want to overnight somewhere--it makes it real obvious it is in use. Not the best stealth camper, but this is "the best" truck camper anywhere for comfort.

I also liked the double slide version which had a cool rotating TV that swung toward the bed or living area. The bathroom is roomy, and reminded me of a real bathroom. Seriously, this would be like living in a house. You could full time in this thing.
Weight is around 3800 lbs and it does have a large cross-section for wind resistance.

To answer your question, I felt my K3500 Silverado dually would carry it, it can carry 5040lbs. It would be pushing the limit if I had another 1200 lbs and my fuel economy would suffer.

Your F450 could easily carry it.
Go for it, I don't think you will regret it. It is a nice camper, particularly for a couple looking for comfort, with space for a few more people if needed.

As for me, I decided to restore an older aluminum framed Barth Camper. I do not need the space of a Chalet RV and want something more stealthy for boondocking that would be warmer. I like metal for fire protection because I plan to install a wood stove. Rebuilding it from scratch means it will be exactly they way I want and a heck of a lot cheaper.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #8125 · Replies: 21 · Views: 53,442

Night_Sailor Posted on: Mar 1 2013, 09:06 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


QUOTE(BobC @ Jul 14 2010, 07:33 PM)
One of the most known green rvers is Brian Brawdy. Has anyone met him?
*



He is not particularly interesting, and mostly trying to promote the sale of various products.
  Forum: Going Green in a Truck Camper · Post Preview: #8123 · Replies: 3 · Views: 51,699

Night_Sailor Posted on: Mar 1 2013, 08:31 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


My camping style is a lot like my sailing style. I like to go far off the beaten path and have maximum hang time. The farther I go, the more interesting things I see in nature.

At home I burn wood for heat and everything possible gets tossed in the fire. Burning is the only reasonable method when sailing or camping, as garbage piles up and is difficult to dispose of some places. Some yacht cruiser just dump their garbage on docks. I offer to pay people to take it. I don't believe in simply dumping it.

When sailing offshore, I use an empty gallon size coffee tin, with holes punched in it all around and on the bottom, big enough to stuff a propane torch, and for airflow. It is fast and easy but does need to cool and be stored in a bucket where it won't make a mess. These tins get to be pretty nasty after a while, so I toss and start over again with a new tin.

Regarding burning, I use a wire to support the tin and click on the torch. Burning plastic stinks a bit, but plastic can't ever be thrown overboard, like paper or left-over food. Often I'll wash plastic bottles out, crush and reseal them, and store in in the anchor locker on shorter trips. That works if you can keep it separate. It is far better to burn it though as space is always tight and newbies always mix the garbage with the plastic. Large plastic kitchen bags are ntoo big to burn. Ideally, you want to burn bucket big enough to hold a half full paper grocery bag. Pull out the bag, half filled is best, drop in the burn bucket, nice and neat. Have two places to store trash in your camper, both the same size so materials can be sorted into burn right now and can burn later. If they are small you might find it easy to simply toss them.

While driving, it is better to have these small bundles of trash, I use Home Depot plastic bags for this sort of thing. They can be tossed almost anywhere--service stations, department store parking lots, etc. No one objects to someone toss and tiny bag in a dumpster. They don't want you to be doing wholesale dumping, so spreading it out makes it unnoticeable. These small packages can be disposed of more easily as they fit in trash can's with narrow openings.

While sailing, I am pretty religious about not bringing things on-board that will have to disposed of later. For example, cereal boxes. I bring the plastic not the cardboard. I bring only the minimum of plastic--things that cannot be repackaged. I sometimes repackage foods into resealable stainless steel containers or more durable Tupperware. I have a few nice plastic containers with lids suitable for cereal and dry goods that seal really well and store compactly. I am a master at organizing space and containers.

All this is applied to my camping philosophy. I bring as little disposable packaging as possible, although I tend to be less concerned about paper.

I am restoring a Barth truck camper at the moment. I removed the heavy noisy furnace, the old water heater, and everything else. I plan to install a very small Sardine wood stove for heat, hot water, and cooking in the winter, and use that year round for burning of trash.

  Forum: Boon Docking · Post Preview: #8121 · Replies: 12 · Views: 43,535

Night_Sailor Posted on: Mar 1 2013, 06:27 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


QUOTE(shakespearesdad @ Jul 18 2010, 11:16 AM)
I have a 1965 Ford F100 1/2 ton long bed. It has the big block 352, 3 speed manual, and I have upgraded to power front disc brakes. The spring are original, the shocks are new.
My question: how much of a camper can I safely haul around. I'm not worried about stopping or going, as much as weight and driveability.
Any sites or info on obtaining a vintage (circa 1965) camper would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
James
North Richland Hills, TX (DFW)
*



You will need to beef up the suspension, tires, and perhaps re-gear it, unless you get a very light camper, like an Alaskan. You might be better off towing a camper instead of carrying one. A 3/4 ton or one ton suspension would serve you better.
  Forum: Matching Truck and Camper · Post Preview: #8119 · Replies: 4 · Views: 17,126

Night_Sailor Posted on: Jun 27 2012, 11:35 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


QUOTE(aqualung @ Apr 21 2011, 01:00 PM)
I'm planning a trip this summer to the rock (NFLD) and was wondering if boondocking is allowed anywhere on the island. I'm plan to arrive in Port aux Basque and travel up through Gros Morne National Park and north along the Viking Trail. I know there are lots of provincial and private campsites along the way but can you just stop along the highway somewhere and spend the night without Johnny Law giving you a ticket?

Also, what's the availability of diesel fuel up there? Do all the stations have it or are they few and far between?

Thanks
Aqualung
*



I don't believe that is allowed, but if you ask the local Provinical Police, and they will tell you, "you can't do it" while at the same time recommend places. "It is not allowed, but if it was me, and I wanted to be left alone, I'd go over to this spot by the river." You can also buy a meal and ask if you can camp in their parking lot and it is never a problem.

There is diesel. I was not in a diesel vehicle, so I can't speak for how much there it. I'd bet it is not a problem if you fill up and ask where the next station is. Not all stations have it. I would not take any chances on running low--anywhere, not just up north, and Sundays could be a real problem finding fuel most places are closed. If it is night time, give up and wait for Monday.
  Forum: Boon Docking · Post Preview: #7309 · Replies: 4 · Views: 25,348

Night_Sailor Posted on: Jun 27 2012, 11:25 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


I bought an old Barth TC that I've gutted to repair a bad jack mount. I had to put wooden supports under my jacks to get this lift I needed to mount and unmount the camper when I bought it.

My Silverado is a 2001 K3500 D/A. The bed sits very high. What sort of jacks will give me enough lift with the old style jack mounts?

I am debating upgrading my jack mounts with some custom built ones. Given that the camper is striped down to the aluminum framing, that would be easy enough.

I don't want to order new jacks and find I need to lengthen them.

Finally, I am debating manual versus electric. Manual is cheaper and mounts to my existing mounting points. My present jacks seem a bit wobbly fully extended.

Electric seems like a good idea because I can lower all of them at the same time, or raise them at the same rate, and it would be faster, and gets the ordeal over with quicker.

My main concern is safety. I need strong reliable jacks that will hold up.

My second concern is mating them up to my frame secures.

Any advice would be welcome, particularly from those with older campers and those that have modified their campers.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #7307 · Replies: 0 · Views: 5,282

Night_Sailor Posted on: Jun 27 2012, 11:05 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


Ignoring pricing for the moment.

9000 BTUs is a lesser load, and I've talk to folks that them me it works great with a TC and runs off a Honda EU2000i no problems. Another consideration is cycling time. A bigger AC will cycle less frequently, which is annoying and doesn't do as good a job removing humidity (I'm told). I went through the same steps you are going through and decide on the Polar Cub listed below.

http://www.adventurerv.net/coleman-polar-c...ioner-p-76.html
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #7305 · Replies: 6 · Views: 10,765

Night_Sailor Posted on: Jun 27 2012, 10:49 PM





Group: Members
Posts: 9
Joined: 27-June 12
Member No.: 6,143


QUOTE(Sailor Dave @ Apr 12 2012, 10:06 AM)
I can tell you right off that you might be dissappointed to find out that beautiful 8 foot bed, crew cab, 4x4, diesel truck you fell in love with isnt designed to carry the weight of the camper you want. But life is full of compromises. And finding the right truck to camper match is no exception to the rule.

Sailor Dave
*



Hi Dave, I'm a sailor too. My 2 cents. Buy a lighter camper. Just like boats, lighter weight is safer, saves on tire wear, handles better, etc. While I like some of these new big campers, size is a disadvantage.
  Forum: Matching Truck and Camper · Post Preview: #7303 · Replies: 14 · Views: 47,489

New Posts  New Replies
No New Posts  No New Replies
Hot topic  Hot Topic (New)
No new  Hot Topic (No New)
Poll  Poll (New)
No new votes  Poll (No New)
Closed  Locked Topic
Moved  Moved Topic
 

Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd November 2020 - 05:33 PM