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WesGPS
When center of gravity is referenced in camper specifications, is the point being referred to the height above the floor in order to give due consideration to lateral roll - - - or is it a fore / aft location (as in an airplane calculation)?

If it is a fore / aft location, where is the reference point? The very front of the cab-over, the front wall, the very rear wall? . . . Where?

Thank you, Wes
aqualung
The center of gravity is the fore/aft center of gravity. Its usually spec'd as a measurement from the front edge of the floor of the camper (where the camper's bumpers will contact the front of the truck bed) towards the rear. Its also usually marked right on the camper.

You need to make sure this point sits in front of your rear axle. Consult your truck's owners manual for the range allowed.
WesGPS
QUOTE(aqualung @ Jun 1 2010, 12:41 PM)
The center of gravity is the fore/aft center of gravity. Its usually spec'd as a measurement from the front edge of the floor of the camper (where the camper's bumpers will contact the front of the truck bed) towards the rear. Its also usually marked right on the camper.

You need to make sure this point sits in front of your rear axle. Consult your truck's owners manual for the range allowed.
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Thanks Aqualung - makes good sense. I'm just trying to do as good a job as I can of researching everything BEFORE plunking down the dollars for the camper.
WesGPS
QUOTE(WesGPS @ Jun 1 2010, 01:03 PM)
Thanks Aqualung - makes good sense. I'm just trying to do as good a job as I can of researching everything BEFORE plunking down the dollars for the camper.
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Whoops - took a couple of quick measurements on the truck. It's not so simple as I first thought. Looks like I need to work out a little arithmetic to find out where the CG of both units combined is to know where the true CG is relative to the rear axle.
aqualung
Absolutely! Do the research up front. Its a lot of dollars for a camper and you don't want to make a mistake. I did a ton of research before buying our camper and I'm glad I did.

You should also do a check of the camper's wet weight and compare against your trucks GVWR to make sure you have room in that area too. It often takes a call to the manufacturer or dealer to find out the wet weight (thats the total weight of the camper plus all accessories installed and with fresh water tank full plus propane tanks full etc). They usually post dry weight on the websites not wet weight. A good rule of thumb is to add 8.5lbs for every gallon of fresh water in the tank and 20lbs for each propane tank unless its a 30lb tank in which case add 30lbs. As for accessories, thats a tough one. If you're looking at a camper on a dealer's lot then there is usually a sticker on the camper with the wet weight as configured. So a quick call to the dealer should answer this question. Also don't forget to include extra weight for passengers, clothing, food, etc.

I took my truck to a CAT Scale and weighed it with the whole family (after a full meal) the dog and a full fuel tank just to make sure of what payload I could actually carry. I did it again after buying the camper and loading it up completely and we came in right around where I thought we would. the CAT Scales will also give you front and rear GAWR in the measurement. For a location near you go see their website at www.catscale.com
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