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SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 20 2018, 10:32 AM





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Depends on where you live and where you drive the truck with the camper off (and on). If you live in an area where the roads are salted, you are better off with the steel because the aluminum will degrade over time. The steel will eust but can be rattle canned, the aluminum cannot. Paint won't adhere to aluminum without surface prep first. I don't have TL's either but I do have their Glo-Step Revolutions on my TC. Nice (but expensive) steps.

The other issue with the aluminum TL tiedown's is, you'll get electrolysis between the steel truck frame and the aluminum foot. Steel and aluminum don't do well together over the long haul.
  Forum: Support Equipment · Post Preview: #3110395 · Replies: 3 · Views: 111

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 19 2018, 09:05 AM





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...and I stated as fact that aluminum isn't the 'holy grail' of framing either, for the reasons I listed.

Now that REV Industries has acquired Lance, anything is possible, including a move out of California east to Indiana, Ohio or Michigan.

Time will tell.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110389 · Replies: 14 · Views: 345

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 17 2018, 11:13 AM





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Lance continually flip flops between wood and aluminum and has for years. I think it depends on the cost of materials more than anything else.

Myself, I prefer wood framing for a couple reasons.
1. Aluminum transfers heat and cold, wood don't. Because the walls of a TC are thing to begine with, any between the wall insulation is minimal to begin with so the aluminum further reduced the insulation efficiency.

2. Aluminum breaks (at the welds), wood flexes. In an off road scenario, you are flexing the camper. Aluminum will break, the wood will give. Very important to me.

3. Welding of the joints themselves. One of the TC owners on RVNet has a Lance with a slide and the lower aluminum extrusion broke at the weld joint and he had to tear the entire side apart to get to it and when he did, the joint was cold welded (looked like bird poop). Aluminum welding takes some skill (even with pulsed MIG and cannot be rushed. In typical RV fashion, Lance did the hurry up and get it done job and the weld failed.

Wood framing, on the other hand flexes and gives and joints don't break. What destoys a wood frame is rot and rot comes about because the owner don't maintain the seals. A weather tight wood framed camper will last indefinitely so long as it's maintained.

Having said that, not maintaining an aluminum framed camper will also cause water intrusion, soaked insulation between the outer and inner walls, mold groth and eventual failure of the aluminum frame because, aluminum also corrodes away.

Northstar (Wiilett Company) only builds wood framed campers. They started out with aluminum frames and years back switched to wood and have stayed with wood since. Northstar will tell you that wood flexes and aluminum don't and they build for off road use. Been building them for 30 years now, I suspect they know.

Myself, I prefer wood, you may not, but don't state that Lance only builds aluminum framed campers because that is not correct. They may at the present time be building aluminum frames, but in past years have built wood framed units. I know, I had one.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110383 · Replies: 14 · Views: 345

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 17 2018, 10:55 AM





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Maybe things will change with Lance, now that they have been bought out by REV Industries. Lance has to be the biggest offender of actual weight versus fantasy weight.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110381 · Replies: 13 · Views: 430

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 17 2018, 10:54 AM





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I know that Capri Campers weighs each individual unit prior to leaving the factory (with all the ordered accessories installed) and that is what they affix as the weight sticker. Don't know of anyone else that does that.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110379 · Replies: 13 · Views: 430

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 16 2018, 09:30 AM





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Lance is using wood framing now and Lance has been bought out by REV Industries. Palomino isn't one of the 'higher end' campers and it's reflected in the price, however, the components in the Lance and Palomino are the same.

I'd rather pay 25 for a unit than 40 for the same thing and just be proactive in maintenance. Having owned and sold a Lance in the past and having both the Lance and the Palomino sitting side by side in the yard, I had the opportunity to compare them.

If I was to buy another unit, I'd buy a Bigfoot or Northstar over the Lance in a minute.

Opinions are opinions and nothing more however and there are a bunch of manufacturers out there. Having said that, Lance is far from the 'holy grail of TC's. There are better built units out there, both more expensive and less expensive.

If Lance was an ultimate TC, no one else would be in business selling TC's. That however is far from the truth.

It all distills down to what you want, your financial assets and your end use.

One issue that had always bothered me about Lance Campers is their constant lying about unit weight. The sticker weight on any Lance is total fantasy. Lance campers typically weigh in the excess of 500 pounds above the sticker weight. Bad business for the end user.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110367 · Replies: 14 · Views: 345

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 15 2018, 06:32 PM





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Actually, if your converter is working properly, the maintenance on a flooded cell (I have 2, Group 31's, is not much more than a twice yearly water check. and insuring the cableing is tight.

The only advantage to a sealed agm is no venting required but my battery box was already vented. Draw down is the same (no less than 50% total charge and charge rates are the same as well. Only advantage is no venting and no water checks, both of which are easy for me.

If I was to go to a different battery, it would be a Lithium or Lithium/Iron Oxide battery. Half the weight of any conventional battery, ability to install anywhere, even up side down and the ability to discharge to almost no capacity remaining without damage.

Problem is, they are very expensive, typically around 800 bucks for a Group 31 equal.

If you have the wallet, a Lithium or Lithium/Iron oxide is the way to fly.

If I was flush, I'd have a pair.
  Forum: Support Equipment · Post Preview: #3110359 · Replies: 3 · Views: 152

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 15 2018, 06:19 PM





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Pop up's like I have and RV Tech has are really meant for only 2 people or 2 and a kid and no more. Not a 'family' camper but are just fine for my wife and I or me and a hunting buddy.

With a pop up, no need to worry about overhead height issues oe rock and roll off road because the vertical Cg is lower but like I said, not a family camper unless you want to be 'close up and personnal with family members.

I had a Lance and sold it and frankly, I don't miss it at all. Hard to store, hard to take down the road (prone to cross winds) and heavy. I have a 1 ton but I always knew the Lance was in the bed. When my pop up is in the bed, don't even know it's there and my fuel mileage is a lot better too. Much less parasitic drag

Big thing that sold me on the pop up was storage. I keep it inside my garage in the off season. The one thing that destroys TC's is leaving them outside all the time, constant weathering ruins them and they develop leaks and eventually rot. Unlike the Lance, mine is inside and protected from the elements. I fully expect it to last at least 10-15 years and still maintain a good resale value. You keep a TC outdoors all the time, if you get 10 years, consider yourself lucky. Most don't last that long stored outside 24-7.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110357 · Replies: 14 · Views: 345

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 14 2018, 04:42 PM





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I'm allergic to payments. If I want something I save up the money and pay cash. Cannot see paying some finance company for use of their money.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110347 · Replies: 13 · Views: 430

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 11 2018, 08:08 PM





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if most owners actually knew what they weighed ready to roll, they'd probably stay home...

What always bothers me isn't the overweight issue but the impact on components.

I realize that typically, components will withstand a substantial margin of over extension but that also shortens component life.

Why I refer to a loaded up TC with slides and on board generator and all the bells and whistles as a barge. A barge on wheels.

TC's are the only guilty RV. You have to wonder how many pull behinds are overloaded as well. At least with a pull behind, you do have another set of brakes or multiple sets even if they are stone age drum brakes.

People want to take everything with them to go camping, IOW, take the house along. Problem is, all that stuff weighs something.

My wife and I have learned over the years to be minimalists. We just take what we need and no more (and we leave the cats at home too)..lol
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110333 · Replies: 13 · Views: 430

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 10 2018, 09:25 PM





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Most folks use a sheet of plywood and it spreads out the weight of the camper better than 2x4's do. You want the load bearing bottom of the camper to be fully supported and the plywood does that.
  Forum: Support Equipment · Post Preview: #3110319 · Replies: 5 · Views: 222

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 10 2018, 09:21 PM





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I'm kind of in the same boat you are, I access on a seasonal road in the forest and every year, first in trip always entails some trimming but my access is narrower than yours is and more densely forested.

I would never go in, in the winter. Way too much snow. 3 feet up where I have my ground is normal..

I like your sawmill video's too.
  Forum: Truck Camper Specs · Post Preview: #3110317 · Replies: 11 · Views: 14,152

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 10 2018, 09:14 PM





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This is my take on it...

You are golden until some little old lady J walks in front of you and you put your foot through the firewall but yo cannot stop in time because the weight of your unit won't allow it, IOW, your brakes are overloaded to the point it's not going to stop in time so you cream the little old lady and guess what..

You get sued and loose everything,

Or, you are in a situation where you need to perform an emergency evasive manuver and you cannot because your outfit is too heavy, or top heavy to allow it so you crash

Either scenario put's you at fault and wide open to a civil suit.

Why I went from a hardside to a pop up. It's lighter. I can actually slide all 4 wheels on the truck on dry pavement with the camper in the bed. Can you? Have you ever tried?

You can run anything down the road but in an emergency / panic scenario you may not be in control anymore.

Myself, I prefer to err on the side of not being overloaded. Easier to control and easier on components too.

You never know when that 'emergency' situation will arise. Better to be prepared than getting caught with your drawers down.

I sure as heck don't want to cream a little old lady or rear end someone because I could not stop in time, because I didn't have enough braking power. In any state, that is 'assured clear distance' and puts you immediately at fault whether the other party contributed to the scenario or not.

I don't ever want to go there. Attorneys love that stuff, it keeps them in fancy cars and lines the client's pockets with settlements.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110315 · Replies: 13 · Views: 430

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 9 2018, 08:46 PM





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If you did that with a TC, you'd have ti do a helluva lot of trimming, even with a pop up TC.
  Forum: Truck Camper Specs · Post Preview: #3110303 · Replies: 11 · Views: 14,152

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 4 2018, 07:47 PM





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NuCamp builds them in Ohio. Nice units, no slides yet and not cheap by a long shot. I don't care for the 'porthole' back door window at all. Liiks funky.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110281 · Replies: 2 · Views: 234

SidecarFlip Posted on: Jan 4 2018, 07:44 PM





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My wife bought me a Furrion for Christmas, year before last. Don't know the asking price (was a gift) but it works fantastic, has nigh vision and a backup grid you can turn on and off. Has good range too. I can be 45-50 feet from the camper and it works fine. In color too.

I picked up the hot wire from my clearance lights to power the camera.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110279 · Replies: 21 · Views: 688

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 31 2017, 09:36 PM





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I just learned something I never knew myself.... I take it the duplex valve is for safety reasons?
  Forum: Support Equipment · Post Preview: #3110257 · Replies: 6 · Views: 860

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 31 2017, 09:34 PM





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Most RV forums I frequent don't allow selling of related items by posters. Not sure why, but they don't.

Good luck with selling it though.
  Forum: Market · Post Preview: #3110255 · Replies: 3 · Views: 319

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 31 2017, 09:31 PM





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I can look right through mine as well but I have a camera mounted on the back of the camper. Makes life a lot easier, especially when towing the quads.

Far as access goes, out pop-up is fully accessable (except the bunk) with the roof down. Toilet, fridge and even the dinette bed is useable. been discussing just that on RVNet in the TC section.

We stop in a rest stop, drop the TL Stow and Go steps, open the door, climb in and go potty or get a sandwich and a cold drink, no issue. In a pinch, we could use the dinette bunk to sleep on with the roof down, not that I would but if I had to stop in say a Wal-Mart parking lot I would.

I cannot stand up of course but it is a pop up, not a hardside and being a pop up, the vertical Cg is lower and the overall weight is lower as well so it makes for a more pleasant drive without being concerned about things like overloaded tires and rims and over taxed brakes.

I don't even know it's back there actually and my truck being a 1997 7.3 isn't exactly a horsepower monster.

Different strokes for diffeeent folks. We went from a pull behind pop up tent camper to a travel trailer to a Hardside Lance to the Palomino pop up and all in all, we like the pop up the best of all we have owned, but again, out personal preference.

The one thing I really like about the pop up TC is the ease of off season storage. It fits in my garage. Truck in one bay, camper in the other. Inside, out of the elements. I usually keep it in the garage when not in use, in the summer too. RV's kept inside last far longer than those stored outside. Mine will be 3 years old this spring and looks showroom new, inside and outside and I expect it to stay that way for long time.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110253 · Replies: 21 · Views: 688

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 29 2017, 02:09 PM





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QUOTE(TurboCorsa180 @ Dec 29 2017, 11:42 AM)
Interesting comments. So, when I started this topic I said that my concern going to a heavier camper was MPG.
Some of these comments reminded me that originally the whole reason for changing out our great TC was concerns about the expandable stairs ( 5 steps) and getting up on the bed. Were getting older and in consideration of that , we thought there might be some better options. The only one we saw that worked was the Lance 1181. There are many but we like a dry shower and all the other stuff. And many with a lower bed and easy access either don't or are too heavy. Not trading my 2002 F250 7.3 with 148K miles just so I can get a dually. We have never needed a generator. We stay at RV parks.
So, think we'll be staying with our 2002 Vanguard 9.5 for a while longer.
*



I'm probably older than you (68) wife 67 and we both have issues getting in the cab over bed. I added a ladder that removes when not in use. Makes getting in and out, easy.

I don't miss my Lance barge at all. Especially when going off road or down the road. My Palomino pop up... don't even know it's back there. I always knew the Lance was back there...always.

I get good mileage as well. 15 with the pop up all the time average. 20 seconds to put the roof up and 6' 6" headroom raised. Even has a crapper and shower for the wife. Me, I can use the woods.

I'd never go back to a hardside TC. Between off season storage issues, wind buffeting and that top heavy feeling, I don't miss them at all.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110243 · Replies: 21 · Views: 688

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 29 2017, 09:07 AM





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The sponsor of this site has many for sale, take your choice. Click on the 'RV Parts' at the top of the page....
  Forum: Support Equipment · Post Preview: #3110239 · Replies: 6 · Views: 860

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 29 2017, 09:06 AM





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Put it on Craigs List or Rv Trader. Chances are no one on here needs it.
  Forum: Market · Post Preview: #3110237 · Replies: 3 · Views: 319

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 29 2017, 09:04 AM





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Bigger barge (camper) = bigger truck. All Lance campers are heavy, much heavier than the sticker weight states. I know, I had one. Was 1000 pounds over sticker... dry.

It's gone, don't miss it.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110235 · Replies: 21 · Views: 688

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 22 2017, 11:14 AM





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Keep in mind too, that end of the year is floorplan tax time for dealers and units sitting are subject to floorplan tax so they want to move them.

I don't know if buying used from a dealer is any better than buying used from an individual. So long as you know what you are looking at and can determine if it has water intrusion issues (most used units do) unless the owner has taken really good care of it and kept it inside when not in use, buying from a dealer is no advantage with a TC.

Besides, a dealer will mark up a used unit whereas an individual might be the price will be negotiable.
  Forum: General Discussion · Post Preview: #3110193 · Replies: 6 · Views: 407

SidecarFlip Posted on: Dec 20 2017, 09:44 AM





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I have a 1997 F350 diesel but it's a powerstroke and it's built and it's a 4x4. I presume you have 16" rims like I do. I run all season Firestone's, 285 x 75 x 16 on mine, load range D, inflated to 80 rear (maximum sidewall listed pressure) and 65 front.

Tires are a personal choice but you need to run D range tires at inflate the rears to maximum listed sidewall pressure. I would surmise that with the Lance Squire you are seriously overloaded. I'd be weighing the truck and camper and then removing the camper and weighing the truck.

I think you'll be amazed at how heavy the camper is. Your rear end (in the truck isn't built for that load. Neither are your brakes or transmission.

Chains are no substitute for 4 wheel drive. The may give you added traction and get you in a bigger mess because without a front drive, you are plowing the front end in loose terrain and that don't work at all.

Besides, chains are a PITA to put on and take off and cannot be run on dry pavement at any speed over about 15 mph.
  Forum: Boon Docking · Post Preview: #3110179 · Replies: 1 · Views: 605

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